Photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren

The Marine Corps is filled with individuals from all walks of life. Regardless of where you came from, every single person who bears the title of United States Marine started out at either the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California or the one at Parris Island, South Carolina.


Marine recruits come from all over the country (some are even originally from other countries) to earn their place among the world's finest fighting force. So, it should come as no surprise that you're going to meet several different types of people as you train. Everyone's different, sure, but you're definitely going to meet these archetypes.

1.The athlete

Atop the list is the most common type of recruit. It's the people who spent their high school careers bouncing between different sports who have the easiest time with the physical training or "incentive" training. You might also find that some of the more physically fit recruits are some of the dumbest. But, then again, it is the Marine Corps.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Walter D. Marino II)

2.The bodybuilder

At first glance, you might think this guy is the same as The Athlete — he's not. Someone who has big muscles might not have an easy time with the cardio-based workout regimen put forth by Drill Instructors. Usually, these types are the berserker-class of recruit and they'll do as much heavy lifting as they can to maintain their mass.

Make no mistake, though, big muscles will not intimidate Drill Instructors. In fact, they'll probably pick The Bodybuilder out as a prime target to break mentally.

They'll have no problem doing this kind of stuff.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Joseph Jacob)

3.The JROTC douche

These are the types who show up to boot camp thinking they know how to play the game and usually try to be a guide for others right off the bat. The problem, however, is that they think their military knowledge is enough to get them through. They often underestimate the Drill Instructors and overestimate their own mental fortitude.

These d-bags show up cocky and leave feeling like the common folk.

There're always bigger fish.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Damon A. Mclean)

4.The military brat

This person might not have been in JROTC, but they grew up hearing stories from one or both of their parents about boot camp from ages ago and show up thinking they know how it works. The truth is, they don't — and they'll come to understand that soon enough.

Their parents' service isn't encoded in their genetics. It doesn't count for anything except (maybe) a cool story.

5.The ninja or thief

They'll try to tell you that no one steals in the Marine Corps. Yeah, that's bullsh*t. People steal all the time and it's certainly no secret. You'll meet the thieving types during boot camp. The ones who will lie, cheat, and steal, either for personal gain or to help out their platoon.

When it comes time to return gear or someone needs a specific item (i.e. extra undershirts, peanut butter, etc.), you might be willing to cut a deal with them. Maybe you'll take their midnight firewatch in exchange for their "services." As much as it sucks to have something stolen, these types often come in handy in saving you (and the rest of the platoon) from an infamous "tornado."

6.The nerd

These recruits are not very common but every platoon will have at least one. You often question why they chose the Marine Corps since their intelligence and physical performance level screams Air Force. They may not always be the most physically fit, but they're often the most mentally strong since they have to compensate in some way.

If they do become a scribe, make sure you're friends. They may come in handy.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Angelica Annastas)

7.The artist

This can mean a few things. This recruit is good at drawing, painting, singing, or all of the above. Regardless, one thing is for sure: They're here for the same reason you are. The drawing/painting types might end up as an "artist recruit" who paints emblems or draws cool things for the Drill Instructors, but they strive to be Marines first and foremost.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Michael A. Blaha)

8.The grand old man

They're not actually very old, given the Marine Corps' recruitment age cap is set to 28 without a waiver. Since a lot of recruits in boot camp are between 18 and 21, the "grand old man" is usually between 24 and 26. Most people around that age get sent during the spring or fall when the 17-year-old prospects are still in high school, but they still might end up in platoon full of much younger recruits.

They usually have a lot of life experience, some might even have college degrees or be married. These are the recruits you want to talk to for some wisdom since they know more about life than you do.

They might say something like this.