The first time we posted some of our favorite morale patches, readers responded with their own and gave us more than enough fodder to present a sequel.


This time we asked Air Force veteran Julio Medina, who's the founder of Morale Patch Armory, why these moto patches endure in popular military culture – even when a command may not fully appreciate them.

"Morale patches are a simplistic form of art that most people can relate to in some way or another," Medina says. "Whether it's humorous or something that will make you embrace your inner patriot, morale patches send strong messages."

The Latin in the patch above means "not worth a rat's ass." During the Vietnam War, troopers who ferreted out Viet Cong insurgents hidden in complex subterranean hideouts became known as "Tunnel Rats." These brave servicemen had to dodge human enemies, animals (like bats), and potentially deadly gasses — not to mention VC booby traps. The story alone makes for a great patch.

The DICASS (Directional Command Activated Sonobuoy System) sends submariners range and bearing data via and FM frequency.

Medina also talked about the elements of a good morale patch.

"Relevance, clean design, and a clear message are key factors in a successful morale patch drop," he says. "There are some amazingly talented artists out there, but unless you have the ability to get relevant eyes on the patch, it will start collecting dust no matter how good it is."

A Combat Search and Rescue patch. Old timers know a similar patch with Elvis on it. This patch, for a new generation, features Tupac.

"Military active duty, veterans, and law enforcement are the largest consumer base," Medina says. "There are quite a few airsoft players in that bunch, too. I'm sure none of these groups come as a surprise. There are so many different styles of patches out there."

 

 

Be sure to check out the Morale Patch Armory to get your unit's patch going.