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"Extreme Ownership" is the fundamental concept of Willink and Babin's leadership philosophy. It means that for any team or organization, "all responsibility for success and failure rests with the leader," Willink writes. Even when leaders are not directly responsible for all outcomes, it was their method of communication and guidance, or lack thereof, that led to the results.

That doesn't mean, however, that leaders should micromanage. It's why the concept of decentralized command that Willink and Babin used in the battlefield, in which they trusted that their junior officers were able to handle certain tasks without being monitored, translates so well to the business world.

'A leader has nothing to prove but everything to prove.'

"Since the team understands that the leader is de facto in charge, in that respect, a leader has nothing to prove," Willink writes. "But in another respect, a leader has everything to prove: Every member of the team must develop the trust and confidence that their leader will exercise good judgment, remain calm, and make the right decisions when it matters most."

And the only way that can be achieved is through leading by example every day.