One of the Marine Corps' greatest heroes had to earn his "butter bars" (as the rank of second lieutenant is called because the devices are yellow/gold in color) not once or twice, but three times before it stuck.


Photo: US Marine Corps

In Nicaragua, Puller earned his first and second of five Navy Crosses and began climbing the officer ranks. After tours of the Pacific and a period training new Marine officers, he returned to combat in World War II and earned two more Navy Crosses. He also fought at Korea, leading the 1st Marine Regiment during the breakout from Chosin Reservoir and earning his fifth Navy Cross.

Over this 27-year period, Puller had made it to the rank of major general. He retired amid medical problems in 1955 and was granted a "tombstone promotion" to lieutenant general. These were promotions given selectively to troops with combat citations to confer extra prestige upon leaving the service, but they didn't entitle the service member to any additional retirement pay. He died in 1971.