"No Easy Day" co-author Kevin Maurer filing a story in Afghanistan. (Photo provided by Kevin Maurer)

Maurer, who sat down with Bissonnette in Virginia Beach five days a week for a month recording the story before writing it out, said the former SEAL was focused on security.

"He was never cavalier about the details," Maurer said. "We talked a lot about things we weren't going to include. It was a conscious decision."

After experiencing firsthand the hew and cry from veterans — as well as members of the special operations community displeased that one of their own had broken ranks by socializing their tactical world on a grand scale — Maurer said he understood the Justice Department ruling. But he added that "the real travesty is that the money [estimated at more that $6 million according to court documents, as reported by NPR] is now going to the government instead of veteran charities as Matt had always intended."

Bissonnette's current lawyer, Robert Luskin, hinted that his client had been made a scapegoat by government officials embarrassed by the information that has come out about the bin Laden raid and other operations in the wake of "No Easy Day" landing on shelves.

"The government has a right to keep its secrets and to enforce procedures that are designed to protect them from inadvertent disclosure," Luskin said in a statement. "But it is shameful that — of all the people who leaked, talked, whispered and backgrounded about the mission — Matt Bissonnette, who risked his life to make it a success, is the only one to pay a price."