In 1958, the DoD's first contracting software was launched, using an early computer language called COBOL. As of 2017, that software still manages Pentagon contracts.


According to Technology Review, the program known as MOCAS, Mechanization of Contract Administration Services, began its life on punchcards. Eventually it was updated to green screened, terminal-style computers.

Grace Hopper could have written a new program for them by now.

It wasn't always this way. The U.S. military is usually known for being on the cutting edge of technological development.

Although the F-14 Tomcat is no longer part of the U.S. Navy's airborne arsenal, the Tomcat was using a 20-bit microprocessor in 1970, the year before Intel created the world's first single-chip four-bit microprocessor.

The 28-point chipset controlled the fighter's swing wings and flight controls.

MOCAS isn't the only antiquated military technology. The U.S. nuclear missile force is known to run on 8-inch floppy disks, and spends $61 billion every year to maintain that system.

The Army's COMPASS system, which tracks the shelf life of Army equipment, is 52 years old.

Furthermore, COBOL, FORTRAN, and Windows 3.1 are commonly found in government systems.