A senior commander of America's top special operations units is worried that small commercially-available unmanned aerial vehicles pose an increasing threat to his commandos on operations around the world.


A captured ISIS drone on the battlefield. (Photo from Iraq Ministry of Defense)

Several months ago, Defense officials claimed ISIS flew an IED-rigged drone into an Iraqi basecamp that was was detonated when soldiers tried to recover it. Dubbed "Trojan Horse" drones, senior commanders have been looking for ways to counter low-tech UAVs on the battlefield.

"We expect to see more of this, and we've put out procedures for our forces to be on guard for this," one commander said, adding that U.S. troops and others have downed many drones harassing coalition troops with small arms fire and electronic means, "with varying levels of success."

Some companies have created drone-killing systems cobbled together from former IED-hunting components. But others believe ultimately the way to shoot down low-cost drones is with other low-cost drones.

"We've made incredible advances in UAS technology that we can exploit, as well as our adversary is exploiting," Lengyel said.