According to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, the average U.S. resident's IQ falls between 80 to 119. Those men and women who make up the "gifted" demographic average the IQ between 130 to 145. The Intelligence Quotient is measured by taking someone's mental age (the age at which they operate) and divide it by their chronological age (the age that they actually are).

Then, multiply that number by 100. So, let's do some math as an example. If your mental age is 14, but your chronological age is 10, divide 10/14. This equals 1.4. Now, multiply 1.4 by 100. You should get 140. If not, then you need to go back to fourth grade.

So, what the hell does that have to do with this article? Well, since not many of us call ourselves "gifted," we can boost our brain functions by increasing this type of exercise we do in our daily lifestyles.


We can boost our brain's function by including aerobic exercises in our workout.

New York University Neuroscientist Dr. Wendy Suzuki recommends implementing aerobic exercise at least three or four times a week to boost brain function.

With this newfound information, gaining this important increase depends on your starting point. If you're a couch potato, you need to up your activity to at least three or four times a week to achieve positive effects. If you're quite active already, you might have to increase your activity more to maximize the brain function boost.

Dr. Suzuki also recommends exercise in the early morning hours because all the brain's neurotransmitters are firing. This comes at a perfect time as most American start work or school later in the morning — so their performance will be increased in time for their day.

In contrast, many Americans work out in the evening to relieve stress after a long day's work. By switching a few of their work-outs to morning aerobic sessions, they can start to make an immediate change in their brainpower.