Serving in the military requires us to be in top physical shape so we spend long hours carrying heavy equipment and kicking down the bad guy's door. Being physically fit ensures that we can take the fight to the enemy and outlast them in any combat situation. It's one of our strongest battlefield advantages.

Unfortunately, when we transition out the service, many of us trade out those brutal workouts in favor of spending more time relaxing on the couch. Those six-pack abs we used to sport at the beach have now gone AWOL. In fact,

"Veterans have a 70-percent higher chance of developing obesity than the general public," Army veteran and fitness expert Jennifer Campbell says.

One reason for this statistic is the dramatic change in a veteran's daily routine once they're out of service. Where once a troop was expected to gear up and get out there for PT every morning, there's no such demand on a veteran. This huge shift away from daily activity makes an equally huge impact on a veteran's body. And, after reaching a certain point of inactivity, a lot of veterans just give up on their physique. Unfortunately, we're not taught how to properly step back into the routine and achieve that lean look you had while serving.

Let's fix that. Here are a few simple few steps that will ease you back into maintaining a healthy lifestyle.


1.Ease back in it

We've seen it time-and-time again: Amateur gymgoers start hitting the weights hard right out of the gate and, by the next day, they're so freaking sore they stop altogether. Mentally, we want to hit the ground running and make a big impact, but slow and steady wins this race.

Start out with something relatively low-impact and gradually work your way up. It's just that simple.

2.Set some goals

We're not superhuman, even if we tell ourselves otherwise. Setting achievable goals, like losing a few pounds over a couple of weeks, is a surefire way to boost your morale. Continually update your goals based on the ones you've already smashed.

3.Track your calories today and cut a few hundred of them tomorrow

We love to eat good food. Let's face it, who doesn't enjoy chowing down on a delicious piece of cake or a juicy cheeseburger? Unfortunately, those foods are super high in calories. So, we challenge you to record all the calories you've eaten today, and, by this time tomorrow, cut the number down by a few hundred.

At the end of the day, losing weight and getting in shape is about achieving a calorie deficit. You must expend more calories than you take in.

4.Conduct a PFT

While serving, your fitness was tested by measuring how fast you ran and how many sit-ups and push-ups you could perform in two-minutes (pull-ups if you were in the Marine Corps). Now that you're out, consider re-testing yourself to better understand where your strength and endurance is at now.

You might not score as high as you once did, but it'll give you a solid goal to work toward.

Senior Master Sgt. Lawrence Greebon, Airey Non-Commissioned Officer Academy Director of Education, performs a crunch in the correct form according to the new Physical Training standards while participating in a new-standards PT test

(Photo by Airman 1st Class Veronica McMahon)

5.Once you're back on track, things get easier.

The hardest part of any fitness program is getting started. As we stated earlier, many people start out strong and quit after a few workout sessions. No one said working out was easy — because it's not — but there is a light at the end of the long dark tunnel.

After you get into the groove of hitting the weights and slimming down, you'll start to notice results. Then, hopefully, what you see in the mirror will inspire you to move forward and continue achieving your fitness goals.