It was what many feared most. Germany's blitzkrieg tore through its neighbors and the Nazis next set their sights on the British Isles. The air-raid sirens cried out as the Germans began a bombing run on September 7th, 1940, that would continue for eight months. The longest stretch of continued bombing was a staggering 57 consecutive days.

And instead of attacking exclusively military installations, the Nazis rained hell over 11 major cities across the British Isles — including London, which took most of the damage — hoping that it would diminish British morale to the point of surrendering just months after the Dunkirk evacuation.

It didn't. Not even close. Yes, parts of the city were 85% annihilated. Yes, food was scarce and disease ran rampant. And yes, up to 43,000 civilians were killed.

But after all that, still only 3% of Londoners thought they'd lose the war.


It was called the "Blitz Spirit." Throughout the entirety of the attacks on London, most civilians weren't even frightened of the bombs. They simply kept calm and carried on. It was so widespread that most people joked about the bombings as if it were nothing but bad weather, remarking on how it was "very blitzy out today."

Although the most iconic photographs from the era are of civilians huddling in Tube stations for shelter, there was actually an astonishing number of people who simply went on with their daily life — just with a couple of explosions happening around them. Instead of hiding or calling for surrender to make the attacks end, there were calls for everyone to join the Home Guard, an unpaid militia for everyone not qualified to fight within the British Army.

Although posters like these did exist during the Blitz, they weren't commonly posted around London... nor were they needed, for that matter. People were following the suggestion regardless.

(United Kingdoms Government)

Surprisingly, the British war effort and the economy were barely affected. The population wasn't afraid to go to work in the morning, so production of weapons, tanks, ammunition, and planes kept on keepin' on. Despite the heavy casualty rates seen before the Blitz, the Brits were at near-full strength by June 6th, 1942 (the invasion of Normandy).

By May 1941, the Germans had ceased the attack on the British Isles because they figured that it was a hopeless endeavor. Instead, they turned their eyes to Operation Barbarossa (the invasion of the Soviet Union).

The Brits had successfully repelled an invader with sheer determination and grit.