For Israel, a simple threat was all the provocation necessary to prepare for war — even if that meant a first strike. After all, Israel did it to great success in the 1967 Six-Day War with Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Iraq, and Lebanon.

Times were a lot more tense at this point for Iranian-Israeli relations (if you can picture that). The President of Iran, at the time, was the fiercely anti-Israel Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who infamously associated with the idea of Israel "being wiped off the map" and later described the Holocaust as a "myth."

Israel doesn't take kindly to this kind of talk.

Also, Ahmadinejad has the world's most punchable face.

According to old Israeli spymaster Tamir Pardo, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered the Israel Defence Forces to be ready to launch an attack on Iran with as little as 15 days' notice. Pardo knew there were only two reasons to give such an order: to actually attack or to make someone take notice that your forces are mobilizing.

"So, if the prime minister tells you to start the countdown, you understand he's not playing games," Pardo told Israeli journalist Ilana Dayan.


The attack would have featured a large air force component, as evidenced by the fact that IDF fighter bombers engaged in a massive air exercise shortly after the anticipated order failed to come in. The Israelis would also have used its Jericho missile systems, a "bunker buster" that can be fired from Israel and hit targets throughout the Islamic Republic.

"Sufa" planes, also known as F-16I, flying over the beaches of Tel-Aviv.(IDF)

In the end, the Israelis didn't go through with the attack because Mossad wasn't 100 percent certain the attack would be legal – or that Netanyahu had the authority to take Israel to war without the approval of Israel's security cabinet. This wasn't the first time Netanyahu tried to take Israel on the offensive against Iran under his tenure. The previous head of Mossad and IDF Chief of Staff were also given the same order by Netanyahu.

They also pushed back against pressure from the Prime Minister, convinced he was trying to ignore Israeli law.