What happens when the two sides of a war fundamentally disagree?


"Uh...well," you're thinking, "that's pretty much the definition of war and you're kind of a donut for asking, aren't you?"

Yes, but hang with me. What I mean is, what happens when the disagreement goes beyond politics or ideology or territorial dispute, when the two sides disagree, on a basic level, about what the war they're fighting is even about? And as a result, fail to agree on how the war will be fought?

Such cases produce quagmires of horrifying scope and duration.

One such case was the Vietnam War.

(Photo via Flickr, manhhai, CC BY 2.0)

It's a hard pill to swallow for soldiers who view themselves as a liberating force, to realize that the people they've been sent to help view them as the enemy, as occupiers, as aliens. It's an issue our troops face every day in Afghanistan and the ever-expanding fronts of the War on Terror, a war that is deep into its second decade.

Mighteousness is a delicate stance and a dangerous dance.