MIGHTY HISTORY

This vet crash-landed a 767 on a race track on family day

The passenger-filled plane ran out of fuel thanks to a math error by ground and flight crew, forcing the pilot and first officer to figure out how to land a plane with no hydraulics and no engine power at a landing strip that he would later learn had been closed and converted to a race track.

Air Canada Flight 143 was supposed to be routine. The crew took possession of their airplane from the departing crew, reloaded on fuel, grabbed the passengers, and headed out of Montreal bound for Edmonton at 41,000 feet.

But then they got a fuel pressure warning. "No big deal," they may have thought. Pumps fail all the time and gravity can feed these engines, "turn off the alarm." But then a second one went off. What they would later learn was that the ground crew had entered their fuel measurement using formulas for pounds — but the systems had been converted to work with kilograms.

Shortly after dinner service, the plane ran out of gas.


The "Gimli Glider" was crash-landed on a race track as families watched in horror and fascination after it ran out of gas thousands of feet in the air.

(Aero Icarus, CC BY-SA 2.0)

The crew heard a long warning noise that none of the members had ever heard before, even in the simulators. The warning signaled a total loss of both engines. The plane had ran out of gas. This is an even bigger problem than it would be in your Chevy since the plane needs engine power to run a host of systems, including the hydraulics

Suddenly, the crew was piloting a massive glider with nearly no power, no hydraulics, and limited instruments — and they were still over 1,000 miles from their destination. To make matters worse, air traffic control suddenly had their own issues guiding the flight since the plane's radio transponders were powered by, you guessed it, the engines.

Luckily, the pilot often flew and towed gliders for fun, and the first officer, a veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces, was intimately familiar with the airspace and landing strips nearby from his time in the service. The two men tapped into their respective skill banks to save the flight and get all 69 people on the plane down safely, eventually netting them awards for their flying in what would later be known as the "Gimli Glider" incident.

This video from Today I Found Out shows how it all went down:

An earlier version of this story referred to the race track as a "go-kart track." The track was being used by small sports cars on the day of the landing, not go-karts.