(Photo by Marine Lance Cpl. John Robbart III)

Whether your personal gym goals are to bulk up or slim down, most people find themselves getting stronger the more they workout. Seems pretty straightforward, right? It makes sense that the more reps you do, the stronger you become.

Unfortunately, that's a freakin' myth — and you should stop believing it this instant.

Sure, when you first pick up a weight and curl it a few times, you'll increase the size of your muscle. But, over time, your body will get used to managing the resistance and start moving it around like it's no big deal. After a while, you'll notice that the weights you once had trouble lifting aren't so heavy and your gains have plateaued.

It sucks, but it happens all the time. Fortunately, there is a way to combat this issue and resolve it sooner rather than later.


Do you notice what this guy is really doing, other than lifting two people?

Observe the glorious gif above. On the surface, it looks like this strong dude is lifting two human beings like it isn't sh*t — because that's precisely what he's doing. The question is, how did he get to that level? The answer is straightforward: The key to gaining strength is to consistently lift heavier weights. Don't let yourself get comfortable.

When you challenge yourself by lifting heavy weights in a controlled setting, you tear your muscles fibers. When those fibers are rebuilt, they're made stronger. Your body will adjust to the amount of weight you're lifting. So, if you don't up the resistance regularly and challenge yourself, your body won't understand that it needs to provide more energy to lift the load.

Nailed it!

After your lifting session is complete, it's essential that you take in the proper amount of protein and calories to allow those muscles to heal. After you repeat this process enough times, the weight that felt heavy just a few weeks ago probably doesn't give you much trouble.

She makes lifting these plates look simple.

This highlights the importance of a gym philosophy, which states "overload over time." This means, simply, that you should be gradually increasing the weight load in order to consistently fail toward the end of your sets. Over time, you should remain overloaded. But you should always give yourself the time needed to recover — if you're going to the gym three to five times a week, diversify your areas of impact. Toss in a lower-body workout between your upper-torso days.

In short: Always challenge yourself and always give yourself time to recover. It's breaking and rebuilding that makes us strong.