Fighting holes have been used as effective defensive positions for decades, stymieing the enemy's deadly offensive movements. Some branches of service refer to these dug-in positions as "foxholes," but both terms refer to the exact same thing.

How a fighting hole is constructed depends greatly on the amount of time a troop intends to spend occupying a position. If a troop intends on staying in the fight from a single position for a prolonged period of time, it might be outfitted with entertainment options to stave off the boredom that comes from long hours of waiting. In this case, it's not uncommon to find things left behind by a previous occupant for the next troop to enjoy.

But, when a fighting hole is constructed and is only going to be occupied for a short period, the troops within need to get clever with killing time. So, if living in a fighting hole is in your near future, learn from the troops before you.

Here's few ways troops have killed time while dug-in on the front lines.


Also Read: 5 of the best ways to get drinkable water while in the field

1.Continuously listen in on the radio

Although there's always someone monitoring the comm gear to relay important messages as they come through, military radios can also be pretty entertaining if you listen closely enough. Communications between various units sometimes plays out like a military soap opera.

Troops request various items, get denied those items, and, if you're lucky, they'll hold down the "push to talk" button on the handset as they talk sh*t after being rejected.

We call these epic fails "hot mics."

Then-Lt. Micheal "Spicy" Dorsey with a smile on his face while in the COC at OP Taylor, Sangin, Afghanistan, 2011.

(U.S. Navy photo by HM3 (FMF) Tim Kirkpatrick)

2.Smoke cigarettes until the sun goes down

In Afghanistan, Pine cigarettes run about a $1 per pack. Ground troops bring a little cash with them to the front line, so they'll often buy smokes off the locals. When there's nothing else to do, they'll chain smoke 'em for entertainment. The only problem is, once the sun goes down, smoking a cigarette is a violation of force protection.

No one wants to bring danger to their brothers just to get a nicotine fix.

3.Think about the sh*t you're going to do when you get home

While you're stationed in a desolate area with virtually nothing to look at but a handful of villagers doing their laundry, troops' minds start to wander, thinking about what they'll do once they get home. Whether it's going surfing, registering for school, or just going out to drink a cold beer, plenty of ideas drift through a troop's mind as they man their defensive position.

HM3 (FMF) Tim Kirkpatrick thinks about the beautiful Southern California warm weather while freezing his ass off in Sangin, Afghanistan, 2011.

(U.S. Marine photo by Lt. Micheal "Spicy" Dorsey)

4.Build narratives of imaginary firefights

When troops are positioned in fighting holes, there's a strong chance they'll take incoming fire — it's less a matter of 'if' and more a matter of 'when.' So, they stay close to their rifles and predict where a threat may come from. They develop a narrative in their head of what actions they might take in order to fight off the bad guys — and maybe score a cool kill shot in the process.

Screw watching Hollywood movies, grunts create their own fiction while they've got nothing but time on their hands.

Pvt. Codi Hoffman waits in a fighting position that he and a few fellow Soldiers built during a battalion-wide field training exercise.

(Photo by Sgt. Christopher M. Gaylord)