Altering graduating from West Point Military Academy at the top of his class, Paul Bucha continued on to Stanford University, where he studied for his Master's degree. During his summer breaks while attending the prestigious college, he received Airborne and Ranger training.

Soon after completing his MBA, Bucha started his military career at Fort Campbell before heading off to Vietnam with the 187th Infantry in 1967. There, he'd face an impossible challenge of leading a company of troops most soldiers would avoid.


Paul Bucha medal of honor Lt. Paul Bucha takes a moment to pause for a photo op while in Vietnam.(Medal of Honor Book)

After Bucha settled into Vietnam, he was quickly promoted and given his first company of soldiers. His brigade commander filled Bucha's newly formed company with those thought to be the 'rejects' of other units. The reputation of the soldiers placed in his company earned them the label of "the clerks and the jerks."

Although the Army's superior officers saw them as duds, the young lieutenant instead saw a great group of troops he was honored to lead into war.

In March 1968, Bucha and his men were the lead elements of a counterattack after the Tet Offensive. For two days, Bucha's men destroyed several enemy strongholds and killed off pockets of resistance. As they continued to push forward, the brave men discovered a battalion-sized element of well-trained Vietnamese fighters.

Paul Bucha medal of honor clerks jerks A photo of some of the members of "the clerks and the jerks."(Medal of Honor Book)

An intense firefight broke out, pinning them down. Bucha surged forward with his RTO while tossing several hand grenades to clear the way. Positioned well beyond the reach of allied artillery, the young lieutenant was unable to call for support — they were on their own.

Bucha continued to lead the men for several more hours as the fight raged on, never backing down. Through the night, he encouraged his men to press on, and that's precisely what they did for their respected leader. Bucha continuously devised and revised plans to keep his men in solid defensive and offensive positions, which saved lives.

By daybreak, Bucha and his men had managed to fight off their overwhelming opposition, leaving over 150 dead enemy troops on the battlefield.

Paul Bucha received the Medal of Honor on May 14, 1970, for personally directing the successful defense of his besieged unit.

Check out the Medal of Honor Book's video below to listen to this incredible story for yourself.