(U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Henry Chan)

Being in the field sucks for almost everyone involved. Lower enlisted get thrown into collective tents, leaders have to train their troops in crappy conditions, that one staff officer never shuts up about how they could "kill for a Starbucks," and everyone has to deal with everyone else's crap. Your experience and level of suckitude may differ.

Civilians pay money to go camping and feel "more rugged" when they wake up outdoors to the sound of birds chirping, so it can't be all bad, right? In the famous words of nearly every old-timer who never shuts up about how much harder it was back in the day: Suck it up, buttercup. Things will be alright once you learn to look at the positives.


1.Bring personal gear with you

It's no secret that the military buys from the lowest bidder. The gear you've been issued has been used repeatedly by several other troops before it finally got to you. If you don't have complete faith in the gear that was handed to you, you can always pick something up with your own cash.

Of course, you should always stay within regulations for most gear, like rucksacks and body armor, but unless you're specifically told not to do so, you can probably get away with bringing a personal sleeping system in addition to the one your unit supplied.

Unfortunately, you can't substitute the food. Hope you enjoy your eggs with extra salt...

(U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Nancy Lugo)

2.Bring stuff to do outside of training

There will be downtime. Exactly how much will differ between units, but you'll at least get a moment to breathe every now and then. In those moments, you'll need something to do other than lose your mind.

It's the field, so it's obviously a stupid idea to bring a TV and video games. If you do, you deserve to be mocked for it. But you can never go wrong with bringing a deck of cards and getting a game of Spades going.

You never truly know someone until you've played with them as your partner in Spades.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Opal Vaughn)

3.Sell wanted stuff to other troops

No one ever brings everything they need to last the entire time in the field. Some may load up their hygiene kit but forget razors. Your unit may be just given MREs and mermites and nobody thinks to bring a bottle of Tabasco. You'll even find people who think a single pack of cigarettes will last them the full two weeks. You could be the guy who makes a quick buck off of the under-prepared.

Even if you don't smoke or dip, there will be others in your unit that do. You'll see them start to get on edge after they've run out by the end of the first week. At that point, no one will bat an eye if you sell them a pack for $20. I mean, technically, MPs might because it's frowned upon by the court of law to sell tobacco without a license, but those profit margins are mighty fine.

With profit margins like that, you can put it on your resume when you leave the service.

(Photo via U.S. Army WTF Moments)

4.Take photos

Of all the regrets veterans might have few about their time in the service, few rank higher than failing to take advantage of photo opportunities with the squad. Years down the road, when those vets are reflecting on how awesome they once were, they'll be disappointed to find the only hard evidence is a handful of photos from promotion ceremonies and an awkward snapshot from a unit ball.

Don't be that guy. Bring a camera or have your phone's camera primed. If it seems like a dumb idea or if things generally sucks, take a photo. Tragedy plus time almost always equals comedy gold. You'll thank yourself later.

No one will blame you if you take pre-CS chamber selfies. We don't want to see your face covered in snot and tears.

(U.S. Army photo by Cpt. Gregory McElwain)

5.Actually listen to what your leader wants to teach you

There aren't too opportunities for a leader to truly break down training and give you a hands-on experience outside of being in the field. That's why you're there in the first place.

They'll have everything planned out to try and prepare you for what's coming later. Listen to them. They've got much to tell you. Believe me when I say this: Your leader wants to teach you everything they know to make you better. If they don't, they're not a leader.

Your leaders are wellsprings of information, both good and bad. It's up to you to learn the difference.

(U.S. Army photo courtesy of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 8th Special Troops Battalion)