Everyone lies — it's natural. To say you don't lie is a lie in and of itself because you know damn well you've told a kid at some point that, "it gets better" knowing full-well it doesn't — especially as an adult. In fact, the only real truth we have is that everyone lies.

So it makes sense that boots will lie their asses off to avoid punishment and, just like any other human, they're bad at it. But even a bad liar can be convincing from time to time. Luckily, the Marine Corps developed the Combat Hunter Program, which enables those who receive the training to proactively assess an environment to gain a tactical advantage over the enemy. Like almost everything you learn while in the service, these lessons can be applied to other areas of life — one of those being lie detection.

Generally, by the time you take on boots, you've become wise enough to identify lies — probably because you told all those same lies when you were an FNG. But if you want to be extra sure that you're getting the truth out of your newbie, watch for these cues:


1.Sweating

In almost every case, when someone's telling a lie, they're nervous — they don't want to get caught. When someone's nervous, they have trouble controlling their perspiration.

Of course, this isn't a foolproof metric, especially when there are external, environmental factors at play — you know, like the sun.

If they're this bad, be especially cautious.

2.Unusually formal language

A person who is a little over-confident in their lie will usually use more formal language. Pay extra attention when someone drops the contractions. Look out for "did not"s and "do not"s in someone's explanation.

3.Direct eye contact

While it makes sense for someone who's nervous or ashamed to look away from the person they're lying to, it's also a very obvious sign. Someone who's trying their best to be convincing knows this and will compensate by looking you directly in the eye.

4.Too many details

Liars have a tendency to over-explain their story. Usually, this tactic is reserved for the more experienced liars. After all, if you've spent time creating, remembering, and parroting a lie, you're going to watch all of those painstakingly plotted details to emerge, right?

5.Fake smiles

If someone is lying to you and hoping to drive the persuasion home, they might smile. Naturally, we smile at each other to signal to another person that we're genuine but, as Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, suggests, an authentic smile is in the eyes — not the mouth.

If they're wearing sunglasses, you might want to have them removed.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alex Kouns)