Each year, like clockwork, hurricane season strikes America's southeastern states. Right now, another hurricane is knocking on the East Coast's door and, coincidentally, many installations of the Armed Forces stand in the way of the storm's projected path. While most people are busy either evacuating or hunkering down, the troops from MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and everywhere between aren't simply waiting out the storm — they're rushing into it.

And the action isn't reserved exclusively for each state's National Guard. Natural disasters, like Hurricane Florence, make for some of the few times when active duty troops from every branch directly help their community. They're springing into action now, helping locals prepare, and they'll be around afterward, helping the affected recover.


It all begins with making proper preparations. Troops begin by stockpiling whatever resources may be useful for civilians, including blankets, MREs, and gasoline, to name a few. Then, they get out there and provide the locals with the essentials.

It may seem like a simple gesture, but being wrapped in a warm, dry military blanket and receiving a hot meal helps repair morale and lets those affected by the disaster know that everything is going to be okay.

A simple meal and a smile goes a long way for people afraid of what's coming.

(National Guard photo by Spc. Hamiel Irizarry)

Next, manpower is put towards barricading specific locations that either serve as excellent shelters or hold significance to the community. This process often involves having troops fill countless sandbags to keep flood waters from reaching the people behind them.

But the Air Force and NOAA are responsible for one of the most important — and dangerous — tasks. They're called "Hurricane Hunters." Their mission is to fly directly into the hurricane to monitor weather patterns and determine the storm's course from the inside.

Meanwhile, the Navy and Coast Guard use their vessels to have hospitals and emergency centers on standby for the moment the hurricane makes landfall.

If there's one thing soldiers know how to do, it's fill sandbags...

(Georgia Army National Guard photo by Capt. William Carraway)

As much as lower enlisted troops may bemoan the process, they're typically evacuated at the last possible moment. This ensures everything is in proper order and it gives civilians a head-start, allowing them to get out of town without being blocked in by clutter created by large military vehicles.

The troops who haven't evacuated will shelter in place until the storm passes. Then, the rebuilding process begins...

It's one of the most beautiful and selfless things most troops will do stateside. BZ, guys. You're making this country proud.

(Louisiana National Guard photo by 1st Lt. Rebekah Malone)