The Army is mulling over where they can set up the Army Future Command. One of the locations that's been on the tips of everyone's tongues is none other than the Motor City — until recently. There are countless benefits that the city of Detroit stands to gain, but the Army would benefit far more if they gave them a second look.


So, why turn down Detroit? The primary reason that Detroit was removed from contention is because of the "livability scale." As a Michigan native, I can assure you those claims are blown out of proportion. Yes, there are bad neighborhoods in Detroit, but the area most suited for the Future Command would be the really-nice suburb of Warren.

'Motown' doesn't just refer to the cars made in Detroit.(U.S. Army TARDEC Photo)

There's historical precedent here. This suburb was once home to the Detroit Arsenal, where the Army manufactured its tanks until 1996. It's still currently home to the Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command. The Army chose to this location for two separate installations throughout history for the same reason they're now eyeing the outskirts of Washington D.C.: it has an infrastructure capable of handling many people.

When many cities around the United States were created, the infrastructure had to evolve around them. Most cities east of the Mississippi River struggled to restructure themselves around a new need to support everyone's cars — except Detroit. In recent years, the infrastructure has taken hits — there's no denying that — but the city has been recovering far faster than anyone cares to admit.

This is the I-75 heading towards Detroit on an average day. Traffic jams aren't really a thing here.(Photo by Sean Marshall)

Choosing Detroit as the center for the Futures Command also affords it many opportunities to work hand-in-hand with TACOM. The tanks and vehicles that are going to be used in combat are literally just down the street. Logistically, this means you can get a good gauge of where the Army is at with a quick meeting at your local Tim Hortons.

Another factor that disqualified Detroit (an excuse first employed by Amazon and seemingly copied by the Army) is the educational credentials of the potential workforce. To counter this, I show you the nearby city — one of Forbes' Most Livable Cities — Ann Arbor. It's home of also one of Forbes' best Public Colleges, the University of Michigan. The workforce is available and highly educated, with 75.2 percent of the population holding a degree and a whopping 10.3 percent with doctorates.

Ann Arbor is essentially the small town you see in every TV show. Except everyone you run into is probably a doctor. (Courtesy Photo)

Detroit and the surrounding regions are making a strong comeback. The goal of Future Command is to detail how the Army will advance it's technology into the coming decades. There really is no better place to look towards than the city that is leading the way.