CBS recently released a story about toxic chemicals at Air Force bases and their link to severe health problems, like cancer and birth defects, but this is in no way new information. In 2001, the Deseret News raised the same question: Do military bases have links to cancer?


The correlation, at least, is astounding.

Members of the 151st Air Refueling Wing Medical Group don their hazardous material suits for training at Camp Williams, Utah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy Giacoletto-Stegall)

And now, in 2018, the communities near Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, are considering a class action lawsuit due to the health defects linked to contaminated water.

The number of people — service members, their families, and civilians in communities near military bases — affected is in the millions (as of 2014, there were 21.8 million living veterans alone).

Related: How Vietnam veterans can get a rare cancer from this parasite

So, while it has been clear since the first World War that the United States and its military has a global impact, and therefore an imperative to maintain military superiority so we may continue to defend not only our way of life, but the livelihoods of our friends and allies, the question remains: at what cost?