MIGHTY MOVIES

This Netflix show depicts veterans surprisingly well

Love, Death & Robots is a science-fiction/fantasy anthology animated series, not exactly the first stop for accurate military depictions. But the creators did an astonishingly good job, filling the military stories with dark humor, service before self, and plenty of both emotional and awesome moments.

(Netflix's Love, Death & Robots)

The popular Netflix show Love, Death & Robots lacks an Oxford comma in the title and gets some details of military service wrong (really wish people would stop having Marines call each other soldier), so you would think a former military journalist would spend the whole time nitpicking it. But it actually portrays vets so well as a whole, that that's what you walk away thinking about.


Soviet soldiers even get an episode.

(Netflix's Love, Death & Robots)

To understand what's going on here, you need to understand that the series is an anthology, mostly of science fiction stories but with some entries that would more neatly be classified as fantasy. Most of them are animated, and one of the live-action episodes stars Topher Grace, so you're going to be rooting for the animated portions.

None of the stories directly feed into each other, and the animation styles are all over the place, but the stories that touch on military service are surprisingly good and come at military service with a real understanding of veterans and military lifestyle. The show isn't about the military, by the way, but about four of the episodes in it are.

(Note, we're going to avoid spoiling the ends of any of the stories here, but there are spoilers for the starts and second acts of multiple episodes after this disclaimer, like, literally in the next paragraph. If you want to watch the series and you want to see each episode completely fresh, click away.)

The mercenaries continue to make fun of each other even as a centuries-old evil hunts them. Anyone who has patrolled with combat arms soldiers will know this is realistic.

(Netflix's Love, Death & Robots)

Take the episode where Marines are bolstered by werewolves. The werewolves are part military working dog, part racially disparaged service members. A lot of the conflict comes from the tension between humans and werewolves, but the moments of bonding come when the Marines lose men and wolves to a Taliban attack and bond together because, regardless of blood, you do not mess with Marines.

Or there's the story of accidentally freeing Dracula from a centuries-long imprisonment. At least one of the mercenaries guarding the archaeologists is a veteran. Likely, all three of them are. They make fun of the academics and each other, came to the fight well-prepared for conventional attacks, and quickly improvise while fighting Dracula. And no matter how dark their mission gets, they still work through it with a dark, dark sense of humor.

In episode Lucky Number 13, a dropship pilot bonds with an "unlucky" ship that, when treated right, saves the lives of the pilot, the co-pilot, and the Marines who ride aboard her. As the dropship performs better and better, the Marines love her more and more, and protect her as fiercely as she protects them.

Marines casually discuss just how haunted their dropship is as they fly into a hot LZ. "We're gonna die, right?" "Probably."

(Netflix's Love, Death & Robots)

As mentioned at the top, the series isn't perfect. The werewolves are offended when senior Marines keep saying they aren't "real soldiers." Some of the tactics are sloppy, some of the discipline is nonsense.

But, as a whole, the writers clearly treated their military characters as full humans, worthy of a deep and real look at what fuels them, what lines they would and would not cross, and what motives may have driven them to cross otherwise uncrossable lines.

Even Soviet troops get a deep and respectful depiction as they brave frozen forests in hunt of an ancient evil summoned by the governments past mistakes. Again, there are great moments of dark humor and familiarity with death that are great.

If you have Netflix, there's a 90 percent chance the service has already suggested the series for you, so just click on it if you want to see what we're talking about. Just search "Love, Death..." if, somehow, it's not in your suggested content. It'll come up quick.

If you don't have Netflix, well, make your own decisions. The episodes are short, so you can easily binge it in a day. You probably don't want to buy a month-long subscription for a one-day series.