Military Life

5 reasons why going underway is the worst

Located in Southern California, Naval Base San Diego is the second largest surface ship base in the United States. Deploying on a ship with a critical mission is supposed to be one of the proudest moment for any sailor. Those aboard get a chance to serve their country by performing the righteous duties for which they've trained hard — in theory, anyway.

In reality, being underway means doing a ton of cleaning and other tasks that fall outside of your regular MOS.


It's not like what you see in those cool television commercials. You won't be working with sailors in the intel room trying to defeat an enemy force while listening to the soothing tone of Keith David's voiceover. In fact, it's almost the complete opposite.

1.Going on watch

If you've ever watched paint dry, then you know exactly how it feels to be on watch — you stare at nothing, waiting for anything to happen. Watch is, by far, is the most critical responsibility on any Naval vessel, but it can also be the most painful. You're looking out for incoming threats, but the likelihood of that happening is slim.

That is, unless you're in foreign seas and Somalian pirates are feeling ballsy.

2.No service

Using these little computers in our pockets, making a call to anyone around the world is as easy as picking up your phone and dialing. However, being underway means you're not going to have any cell service — much to the devastation of millennials.

The idea of not knowing what everyone's doing back home or what's happening in the rest of the world can be a little unsettling. After weeks of limited-to-no connectivity, that moment when you reach port and see service bars on your phone is glorious.

3.Sleeping quarters

After a long day, it's finally time to hit the sack — but you don't get to sleep in a big bed like you did back home. You get to sleep in a rack that looks and feels like a coffin. It may be comfortable for vampires, but for everyone else, it's anything but that.

Let's be real, three-man bunks with a minimum of 20 to 30 roommates — does this sound like a good time to you?

4.Sweepers, sweepers, all hands man your stations

If you're a sailor, you know how this feels. Once you wake up and get ready for your day, you know what's about to happen. So, grab a broom and get to cleaning, because there's always a petty officer around the corner reminding you to do so.

Welcome to hell.

It sounds easy at first, but after a day of working on the ship, the last thing anyone wants to do is pick up another freakin' broom — trust us.

5.Leaving your family

This is a topic that all veterans can relate to. Above all else, the reason we continue to fight is to protect the many families of our nation. Leaving them behind is extremely difficult. You have been their sworn protector for as long as you can remember, and now you must leave them to fulfill your obligations to our great country.

Saying goodbye to your loved ones — and not knowing exactly when you will return — is, by far, one of the hardest things about going underway.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gabriela Hurtado)