When the Space Force eventually gets off the ground and troops start making their way toward the stars, they'll be elevated as people. No, we're not talking about physical elevation. And no, we're not talking about the status that comes with being one of the elite few to break the Earth's atmosphere. We're talking about elevation on both a spiritual and moral level.

Every astronaut that has been to space shares an experience. From up there, they can look back at this tiny, pale blue speck of space dust, and it's a life-changing, mind-opening sensation. This isn't to say that "many" astronauts have this experience — it happens to every single astronaut from all walks of life and from every nation. It's a feeling that astronauts have reported completely independent of one another.

It's what they're calling the "Overview Effect."


You spend your entire life in one spot on this planet, or maybe you've traveled across it — regardless, you're only ever seeing a small fragment of the whole. It's only when you can step back (or out, in this case) and truly see the big picture that you can really take it all in.

By looking down at this planet from outer space, astronauts can see everything. Every life born. Every country and its cities. And the collection of glimmering lights on the surface is its entire living population. Photography from space has been around since the 1960s — the famous Blue Marble photo, the very first full-planet photo, was taken on December 7, 1972 — but it doesn't elicit the same response as seeing it with your own eyes.

Space Force Iconic

It's been described as being set free from Plato's Cave. Suddenly, you're looking at Earthly issues from a galactic perspective — and it changes everything.

Funnily enough, the phenomenon wasn't been recognized until 1987, when philosopher Frank White put a name to it, calling it the "Overview Effect." The very first human being in space, Yuri Gagarin, first gave clues to his experiencing of the Overview Effect by saying,

"Circling the Earth in my orbital spaceship, I marveled at the beauty of our planet. People of the world, let us safeguard and enhance this beauty and not destroy it."

It's also worth noting that he also never said, "I see no God up here." That's a myth.

Astronauts come back with a sense of purpose after taking in such an awe-inspiring view. It's hard for minor problems to bother you, apparently, when you've been given a look at the true scale of such problems. They describe it as a form of transcendental meditation when they realize what they're looking at.

Astronauts who've experienced this sensation say it never leaves them, and they'll remember the feeling until the day they die. Ed Gibson, the science pilot aboard the Skylab 4 once said,

"You see how diminutive your life and concerns are compared to other things in the universe. Your life and concerns are important to you, of course. But you can see that a lot of the things you worry about do not make much difference in an overall sense."